Facebook  Twitter  Youtube  ISSUU  RSS  Email


Media Contacts

UK
Press Office
press@transparency.org.uk
+ 44 (0)20 3096 7695
Out of hours: Weekends; Weekdays (17.30-21.30): +44 (0)79 6456 0340


Tag Cloud

Allegations anti-bribery anti-corruption summit AntiCorruption anti money laundering bribery BSkyB Cabinet Office companies conflict Corporate Cooperation corrupt capital Corruption corruption in the uk employment film financial secrecy Governance Government health Home Office journalists Letter Leveson Inquiry London Merkel metropolitan police money laundering moneylaundering offshore tax open governance pharmaceuticals PHP police ethics Prime Minister Register of Interests Research safe havens Social Accountability Trustees UK Unexplained Wealth Orders unmask the corrupt UWO vacancies

Twitter

TransparencyUK Great that the Gov has updated on the introduction of a public register that would remove anonymity of those using… https://t.co/CWdRME62Qx
TransparencyUK “The organisation itself knows this hospitality should have been declined” said @duncanhames. Director of public bo… https://t.co/1m1QvZHAfb

Stay Informed

Sign up for updates on TI-UK's work & corruption news from around the globe.

Recent Blog Posts

Search Blog

A new study on donor transparency shows that many aid agencies are not putting into practice the levels of disclosure that they typically demand from the governments which receive their money. Produced by Publish What You Fund, the global campaign for aid transparency, the study compiles an index to see how different donor agencies measure-up when it comes to opening up their own books on how much aid they give, where and what for.

 

In a report published by Transparency International UK earlier this year, respondents were asked to rank several scenarios as a possible example of corruption. 86% of respondents thought that ‘a seat in the House of Lords for a businessman who has made large donations to a political party’ was potentially corrupt, the highest score for any of the scenarios.

Maria Gili and Leah Wawro of Transparency International’s Defence and Security Programme outline obstacles to more transparency and accountability in how countries spend their defence budgets.

 

2011 has been a year of passionate political protests around the world, often provoked by high levels of corruption in public life. Many citizens feel their leaders and public institutions are neither transparent nor accountable, and all too often are systemically corrupt. 

Rachel Davies speaks to Robert Barrington, Director of External Affairs at Transparency International UK, about anti-bribery procedures and TI-UK’s new training module, Doing Business Without Bribery.

Commercial businesses owned by the military are a surprisingly common phenomenon which is open to a wide range of potential abuses. As there is extremely limited information on such businesses, Transparency International’s Defence and Security Programme (TI-DSP) has taken a first step through an initial review. Saad Mustafa explores the topic.

The Indian government recently decided to spend $11 billion to purchase Rafale fighter jets from Dassault Aviation. The deal includes a commitment from the company to spend $6 billion in the country– a typical “offset” contract that often accompanies defence sales and can be spent on projects ranging from direct technology transfer to those unrelated to the defence procurement such as building roads.

This week the European Commission has published an EU-wide public opinion survey on corruption. It highlights the fact that citizens across Europe perceive corruption as a major problem, and includes opinions on which are the most corruption-prone sectors.

The shocking revelation that a Conservative party co-treasurer offered access to the Prime Minister and Chancellor for up to £250,000 underscores the need for urgent reforms to clean up political party funding in the UK.

Yesterday, Deputy Assistant Commissioner Sue Akers suggested to the Leveson inquiry that some sections of the press have been making regular payments to a network of corrupted public officials.

Contact Us | Sitemap | Privacy

UK Charity Number 1112842

Transparency International UK is a chapter of