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Dominic Kavakeb
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David Lewis, Executive Director of TI’s chapter in South Africa, Corruption Watch, reflects on the country’s current situation and the tools available to civil society to fight back against corruption. When, in the period leading to the formation of Corruption Watch, I traipsed around South Africa and the world seeking the support of multilateral institutions,

As some of the UK’s Overseas Territories face up to the devastating impact of Hurricane Irma, is it right that conditions should be placed on aid? In a humanitarian crisis, immediate aid for the victims must be the first priority.  That should certainly be the case, without conditions, for the UK’s Overseas Territories affected by

Like most investigations into corruption, the independent reports into the Bell Pottinger case have lifted the lid on the dark underside of a company and industry that like to present themselves as highly respectable and making a valuable contribution to the UK’s economy. Let me start with a caveat to what follows.  Many communications professionals are

Munye Abrar is a 17-year-old student who recently spent a week on work experience with TI-UK. Here he reflects on his time fighting corruption: Fighting corruption is not the way Batman makes it seem. There are no capes, gadgets, high speed chases and butt-kicking of eccentric villains. At least not at Transparency International UK (TI-UK).

In 2016 the UK’s Overseas Territories and Crown Dependencies committed to introduce central registers of beneficial ownership information or ‘similarly effective systems’ by 30 June 2017. How have they fared, and how much work is still to be done?

The last year has seen the UK involved in a number global money laundering cases. In a bid to end the UK’s role as a safe haven for corrupt funds the UK Government took emergency steps two weeks ago to meet a key EU deadline to improve anti-money laundering standards by bringing in new legislation.

There has been much talk of corruption in the aftermath of the Grenfell Tower tragedy.  Could corruption have played a part in the alleged catalogue of errors and shortcuts that led to so many lives being lost? 

The ability of fake news to influence public debates and democratic processes, including elections, has recently caused worldwide concern. Dr Hans Gutbrod, Executive Director of Transparify asks should we be worried about fake news influencing UK elections?

“The UK’s prime minister is seeking support for her government in negotiations with a party leader who lost her hold on government over serious questions about the use of public funds.”

The Criminal Finances Act, which received Royal Assent in April, introduces new measures to tackle asset recovery and money laundering in the UK. A key element of the Act is Unexplained Wealth Orders (UWOs) – an investigative tool to help law enforcement act on corrupt assets. This is something that Transparency International has been pushing for since 2014.

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