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Viktor Yanukovych is gone, but where are Ukraine’s missing millions?

Written by Guest on Tuesday, 25 February 2014

The fast-moving events of the past few days in Ukraine have shown the depth of anger over the violence and corruption of the regime of Viktor Yanukovych and his cronies. There may now be early elections, and Yanukovych has fled, but this alone will not heal the wounds of the past few years.


The fast-moving events of the past few days in Ukraine have shown the depth of anger over the violence and corruption of the regime of Viktor Yanukovych and his cronies. There may now be early elections, and Yanukovych has fled, but this alone will not heal the wounds of the past few years.

The pictures of the former president’s plush compound – his vintage car collection and fancy pheasants, the private restaurant and golf course – have struck a chord in the same way the palaces of Ben Ali and the wealth of Hosni Mubarak angered the people of Tunisia and Egypt.

Ukrainians want those in power and their accomplices who used their positions to pillage the public coffers held to account, and measures taken around the globe to make sure this cannot happen again.

This means enforcing anti-corruption and money laundering legislation in the places where the ill-gotten gains have ended up, not just in Ukraine. This will require a consistent and sustained change of policy. It should and could have happened sooner in Ukraine.

The corruption at the heart of Ukraine’s political system that has enriched the few – and disadvantaged the many – was only sustainable through the knowing compliance of actors in the financial systems of those same states now lecturing Kiev on good governance and democratic values.

The full version of this article is available on the Guardian website. 

 

Oleksii Khmara is Executive Director of Transparency International Ukraine. The full version of this blog post was published by the Guardian – comment is free.

 

 

 

 

 

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Read 4374 times Last modified on Tuesday, 24 November 2015 11:47

Guest

The TI-UK blog features thought and opinion from guest writers as well as TI staff. Any opinions expressed by external contributors do not necessarily reflect the views of Transparency International UK.

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