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Dominic Kavakeb
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What do Google and the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China have in common? What about Amazon, NTT and China Shenua Energy Company?  Give up? They all scored near the bottom (around a 20% score), in our 2014 Transparency in Corporate Reporting (TRAC) study, which we released today. 

We have heard the news today that a settlement has been reached in the Bernie Ecclestone bribery case. Although the full details of the case and settlement have yet to emerge, it looks disturbing at first sight.

This month three years ago, the UK Bribery Act came into force. But how effective is it? We’ve asked experts from academia, civil society, law, business and government.

The Bribery Act is four years old. But now we have a bribery law that is fit for purpose in the UK, why are we not seeing more prosecutions?

As the Crimea crisis has developed, there have been calls to freeze Russian and Ukrainian assets in the UK.

As David Cameron promises to create a “partnership for growth and reform” in China, is there a risk that a blind eye will be turned to difficult questions relating to issues such as corruption?

At a time when corruption is perceived to be on the increase in the UK, a misinformed de-regulatory initiative is looking at rolling back efforts to fight corruption by watering down the Bribery Act.

There needs to be full understanding of the damage caused by facilitation payments on companies and societies. This understanding is lacking in the current debate on a revision of the Bribery Act.

A common approach of those trying to undermine the Bribery Act is to pretend it is an instrument of oppression preventing honest businessmen from doing business. The pretence is advanced by asking questions that are absurd in the hope of evoking absurd answers.

According to reports, the UK Government is considering reviewing the Bribery Act, specifically the section on ‘facilitation payments’, otherwise known as bribes. Since the Bribery Bill was introduced in 2009 there have been concerted efforts by a small but vocal minority to water it down or prevent it passing into law.

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