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Our Defence and Security team will launch its new Government Defence Anti-Corruption Index on Tuesday 29 January 2013. The index will provide a detailed analysis of the corruption risks faced by the defence establishments of 82 countries around the world. In preparation, project officer Leah Warwo examines the risk of political corruption in the defence sector. For politicians looking to illicitly fund their election campaigns, the defence sector—with big deals, huge budgets, high secrecy, and funded with your taxpayers money—can be a prime target.

Our Defence and Security team has today launched the Defence Companies Anti-Corruption Index (CI).This is a brand new Index that has taken us almost two years to complete. It analyses whether the world’s biggest defence companies – 129 companies from 31 countries – are doing enough against corruption.

On 4 October 2012, for the first time the public, governments, and industry will be able to assess what defence companies do—and fail to do—to prevent corruption.

 

Our Research Lead on defence, Saad Mustafa, explains the importance of addressing corruption in the settlement stage of a conflict

Though there are international treaties to control the sale of many goods, from dinosaur bones to postage stamps, there is no such treaty to control the trade in weapons worldwide. From July 11 to July 15, the 192 member states of the United Nations are meeting in New York to continue their negotiations towards an “Arms Trade Treaty” (ATT).

The Indian government recently decided to spend $11 billion to purchase Rafale fighter jets from Dassault Aviation. The deal includes a commitment from the company to spend $6 billion in the country– a typical “offset” contract that often accompanies defence sales and can be spent on projects ranging from direct technology transfer to those unrelated to the defence procurement such as building roads.

Commercial businesses owned by the military are a surprisingly common phenomenon which is open to a wide range of potential abuses. As there is extremely limited information on such businesses, Transparency International’s Defence and Security Programme (TI-DSP) has taken a first step through an initial review. Saad Mustafa explores the topic.

Maria Gili and Leah Wawro of Transparency International’s Defence and Security Programme outline obstacles to more transparency and accountability in how countries spend their defence budgets.

 

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