Facebook  Twitter  Youtube  ISSUU  RSS  Email


Media Contacts

UK
Dominic Kavakeb
dominic.kavakeb@transparency.org.uk
+ 44 (0)20 3096 7695
Out of hours: Weekends; Weekdays (17.30-21.30): +44 (0)79 6456 0340


Tag Cloud

Allegations anti-bribery anti-corruption summit anti money laundering bribery BSkyB Cabinet Office Chart companies conflict Corporate Cooperation corrupt capital Corruption corruption in the uk employment film financial secrecy Governance Government health Home Office illicit enrichment intern journalists Letter Leveson Inquiry London Merkel money laundering offshore tax open governance pharmaceuticals PHP Prime Minister Register of Interests Research Resources Social Accountability statement Trustees UK Unexplained Wealth Orders unmask the corrupt UWO vacancies

Twitter

TransparencyUK RT @duncanhames: Too many new homes in the borough are actually being bought by overseas companies registered in secrecy havens: https://t.…
16hreplyretweetfavorite
TransparencyUK RT @LeaskyHT: Good detail on Scotland's SLP money-laundering industry from our colleagues at the @Sunday_Post https://t.co/aBpNlflfd1 https…
19hreplyretweetfavorite
TransparencyUK RT @TI_Defence: "Corruption, the second major challenge for Iraq" writes @adnanhussein for @AlArabiya_Eng https://t.co/y8JKBPgDby
19hreplyretweetfavorite

Stay Informed

Sign up for updates on TI-UK's work & corruption news from around the globe.

Recent Blog Posts

Search Blog

How much corrupt money is laundered through the UK each year? You’d think there’s an official statistic for this, like inflation or GDP, however you’d be wrong. Measuring global flows of corrupt wealth, like measuring corruption in general, is incredibly difficult. This is largely due to its secretive nature. Corrupt politicians, officials and oligarchs bringing

Jameela Raymond on why the UK’s Anti-Corruption can be a real catalyst for positive progress in the global fight against corruption.

Leaving the EU will have profound consequences for the UK.  But will it be good or bad for the fight against corruption?  Robert Barrington looks at some of the possible consequences.

Another year, another Bilderberg conference done and dusted. Henry Kissinger has left the building. The limousines, bodyguards and snipers have left, the snazzy Airbus bubble-tent has been deflated, but some tricky questions remain. Questions, primarily, for the politicians who attended.

Corruption within the pharmaceutical and healthcare sectors is a matter of life and death. It has a corrosive impact on health, negatively impacting public health budgets, the price of health services and medicines, and ultimately the quality of care dispensed. Reports estimate that as much as 6% of annual global health expenditure is lost to corruption

On Thursday of next week, at a luxury hotel in central Dresden, the doors of the annual Bilderberg policy conference will be flung open. Not to members of the press, mind. In fact, perhaps “flung” is overstating it. Gingerly, behind a battalion of armed police, private security and secret service bodyguards, the hotel door will be cracked ajar, and in will slide a handpicked few of the most senior corporate executives in the world: board members of transnational banks, chairmen of global energy companies, and the owners of vast industrial and media conglomerates.

The global pharmaceutical sector is highly vulnerable to corruption abuse, with both governments and companies needing to properly address the corruption risks. In this mini-blog series two insights of corruption in the health systems, which the pharmaceutical sector is a dominant area of, are given. Both of insights come from Nigeria, a country that demonstrated

The global pharmaceutical sector is highly vulnerable to corruption abuse, with both governments and companies needing to properly address the corruption risks. In this mini-blog series two insights of corruption in the health systems, which the pharmaceutical sector is a dominant area of, are given. Both of insights come from Nigeria, a country that demonstrated

We are now two weeks away from the Anti-Corruption Summit that the Prime Minister announced last July in Singapore. Will it be a success?

Last week, the government published the agreements it has just signed with the Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories for data sharing among law enforcement agencies. It’s not exactly the full transparency the Prime Minister has been pushing for. Is it therefore a step forward in a longer journey – or just a smokescreen to make lack of action look like something more impressive?

Contact Us | Sitemap | Privacy

UK Charity Number 1112842

Transparency International UK is a chapter of