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Dominic Kavakeb
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Sue Hawley is an anti bribery expert with Corruption Watch, in this blog she provides her insight into the Rolls-Royce and Serious Fraud Office’s Deferred Prosecution Agreement.

With the dawn of a new era due to start next year with Trump’s inauguration, his administration is unlikely to sustain America’s recent leadership of global attempts to clean up politics and business

Most of the coverage of the Rolls-Royce case has focussed on the size of the fine, and whether it was right for a Deferred Prosecution Agreement (DPA) to be used. Robert Barrington reflects on other aspects of the case.

Duncan Hames, Director of Policy, takes an in-depth look at some of the debates following the Leveson Inquiry

As 2016 draws to a close, Robert Barrington looks at the state of the fight against corruption in the UK and around the world, with guest contributions from some well-known figures in the Transparency International movement.

Peter van Veen looks back on 5 (and a half) years of the UK Bribery Act, covering business attitudes, SFO investigations, deferred prosecution agreements and bribery standards.

Robert Barrington outlines Transparency International’s stance on tax abuse after returning from the Annual Members Meeting (AMM) in Panama City, Panama.

In May of this year, the government announced that the UK would publish its first-ever Anti-Corruption Strategy before the year end – a commitment renewed by the government of Theresa May. Here Robert Barrington discusses how the Strategy needs to set out the government’s response and long-term vision in dealing with corruption and the risks of not having a strategy at all.

In a report published today, Professor Mark Knights shows how Britain’s history has shaped what we understand by the term ‘corruption’ as well what measures we see as being effective or necessary to curb it. ‘Corruption’ and ‘anti-corruption’ have not been (nor are they now) universal, timeless, context-less phenomena but should be seen as conditioned by the past.

Why did people vote for Trump? Why did they vote for Brexit? There are many reasons, but a particularly strong theme of the Trump campaign was that the political establishment in Washington is corrupt. Not inefficient, or self-interested, or in a Washington bubble: but out and out corrupt.

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