Facebook  Twitter  Youtube  ISSUU  RSS  Email

Media Contacts

UK
Dominic Kavakeb
dominic.kavakeb@transparency.org.uk
+ 44 (0)20 3096 7695
Out of hours: Weekends; Weekdays (17.30-21.30): +44 (0)79 6456 0340


Twitter

TransparencyUK Lack of transparency over £6,000 Northern Ireland donations fine "concerning" https://t.co/ta3UzEGiTy
7hreplyretweetfavorite
TransparencyUK @shelleyparry @WeAreSfGH Send to info(@)transparency(.org).(uk) and will forward onto the relevant team, thanks!
8hreplyretweetfavorite
TransparencyUK RT @anticorruption: Transparency International condemns raids and harassment of civil society in #Kenya. > https://t.co/7XFgPxIsEI https://…

Tag Cloud

Allegations anti-bribery anti-corruption summit anti money laundering bribery BSkyB Cabinet Office Chart companies conflict Corporate Cooperation corrupt capital Corruption corruption in the uk employment film financial secrecy Governance Government health Home Office illicit enrichment intern journalists Letter Leveson Inquiry London Merkel money laundering offshore tax open governance pharmaceuticals PHP Prime Minister Register of Interests Research Resources Social Accountability statement Trustees UK Unexplained Wealth Orders unmask the corrupt UWO vacancies

Stay Informed

Sign up for updates on TI-UK's work & corruption news from around the globe.

Are aid donors walking their own talk?

Written by Guest on Wednesday, 9 May 2012

A new study on donor transparency shows that many aid agencies are not putting into practice the levels of disclosure that they typically demand from the governments which receive their money. Produced by Publish What You Fund, the global campaign for aid transparency, the study compiles an index to see how different donor agencies measure-up when it comes to opening up their own books on how much aid they give, where and what for.

 


A new study on donor transparency shows that many aid agencies are not putting into practice the levels of disclosure that they typically demand from the governments which receive their money. Produced by Publish What You Fund the global campaign for aid transparency, the study compiles an index to see how different donor agencies measure-up when it comes to opening up their own books on how much aid they give, where and what for.

The index looks at 58 agencies, ranging from the World Bank’s International Development Association (the top performer) to Malta’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs (the worst performer). In many cases, different agencies within the same institution or for the country are assessed. For example, three agencies from the EU and four from the United States are separately analysed to see how easy it is to follow the flow of the money. Overall 11 of the 15 worst performers on the index are EU member states. These include Spain Portugal, Latvia, Italy, Poland and Hungary.

The degree of low-quality aid information provided by donors can be startling. In completing the study, the only information found on one of France’s top aid recipients, Cote d’Ivoire was about a project commemorating two decades worth of research on chimpanzees. In the case of Austria the figures showed that the fourth biggest recipient of the country’s aid agency’s funding was the government of Austria.

These examples may seem humorous but they are worrying given the sums and stakes at play. In 2010, the latest year for figures on official development assistance, US$ 128 billion was spent on aid. These monies are supposed to be producing development results and helping the world’s poorest change their lives and futures.

But without timely, comparable and accessible information on the money be given, it is impossible to assess whether such outcomes are happening. By keeping donors’ books closed, there is a risk of waste, mismanagement and corruption.

Greater levels of transparency should be the norm, not the exception, for development efforts to be effective. Donors often urge partner governments to take measures that institutionalise transparency accountability and integrity. From an aid effectiveness argument, these good practices make sense as they have been seen as having a real development pay-off. The question is, why are donors not doing the same.

Craig Fagan is Senior Policy Coordinator at Transparency International’s International Secretariat in Berlin.

 

4619

Read 4619 times Last modified on Tuesday, 24 November 2015 11:47

Guest

The TI-UK blog features thought and opinion from guest writers as well as TI staff. Any opinions expressed by external contributors do not necessarily reflect the views of Transparency International UK.

Leave a Reply

Contact Us | Sitemap | Privacy

UK Charity Number 1112842

Transparency International UK is a chapter of